We aren’t all Graphic Designers. And not all of us have the budget to hire one. This can feel intimidating when you’re dealing with a VISUAL platform. If the Pin image is one of the most important elements on Pinterest what are those among us who are graphically challenged suppose to do to succeed?

The good news is there are a few elements we can all achieve to create a great Pin. Here are five things to remember when you are creating a Pin to maximize your views and click-throughs.

Make it the right size –

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Pinterest has been very clear. They want your pin to have a 2/3 ratio. Think tall rectangles. They should also be a minimum of 600 x 900 pixels. For awhile what we now call “giraffe pins” were the hot ticket. These pins were supppppppppppppeeeerrrr long. Do you remember you use to have to scroll and scroll and they just kept going? If a long pin works than a longer pin is better became the mindset and things got a bit out of hand. Pinterest has announced they may now be cutting of these long pins in our feeds, if you are active on the platform you have probably seen plenty of evidence they are doing just that.

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If you like the look of a longer pin you can still safely take your pins out to 1260 px. Remember to test! You can run pins at 600 x 900 and 600 x 1260 to see what resonates better with your audience. Just remember to avoid being cut off don’t take it longer than that.

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Keep it bright –

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Lighter brighter images tend to perform better on Pinterest.

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Here is my food for thought on this one, I have seen dark images perform really well too. What do I think the common link is? They were dark intentionally. A gorgeous dark skyline punctuated with bright contrasting text or beautiful moody images can grab your clients eye too. If they are a well taken and edited image. In fact, you may stand out more in a sea of white backgrounds.

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What isn’t going to work? A dimly lit image that should be bright. A poorly edited murky on accident photo. If the photography isn’t up to par skip it for your pin. If you struggle to take your own images there are a lot of stock photography options.

Add a Call to Action

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Pinterest is always updating and changing the amount of text, and what text they display under a Pin. In addition, it isn’t always the same depending on whether you are on mobile or desktop. You can’t rely on your description or title to tell people what your Pin is about.

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You should be adding text overlays on your Pins. The text you add should give the user a quick idea of what the post is about, and also why they want to click over. Make it enticing.

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Remember you has only seconds to get them to stop scrolling and click on your pin. Stumped on good CTAs? Scroll through your feed for inspiration which Pins make you want to click.

5 Steps to creating pins that get clicked even if you aren't a graphic designer.

Make it Good on Mobile

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A ton of your Pinterest traffic is going to come from mobile. I typically see between 80-60% of Pinterest traffic coming in off of a mobile device. You can check your analytics to see what it looks like in your Niche. I would wager a good amount it is at least 50%.

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This means you want to double check your Pin designs on mobile. Can you still read them on that scale? Is the text large enough? Does the image translate. I think I’m pushing it a bit with the script in the image above….but I’m going to test it out!

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Keep it On Brand

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Developing a consistent look for your Pins will help your audience recognize them and click on them more. Keeping those designs on brand, so when they land on your website they feel like it makes sense and they are in the right place, will keep them on your site longer and more likely to translate into an email subscriber and return visits.

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How do I make the graphic?

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The good news is you do not have to be an Adobe pro to make graphics. You no longer need to edit images in Photoshop or create graphics in Illustrator to get professional looking results.

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My favorite picture editing tool is PicMonkey (unfortunately there is no longer a free version though I believe there is still a trial option). For creating graphics I rely on Canva. There is a free version of that. If you are looking for more ideas and inspirations for Canva editing you can check out my board here. 

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You can upload that image directly to Pinterest to start pinning. Check out my tutorial on creating a Pin on Pinterest here.

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I want to hear from you. What is the number one thing you think makes a pin click-worthy?